NATIONAL PARKS GUIDES: CUYAHOGA VALLEY

Cuyahoga Valley is quite literally an oasis tucked inside the massive suburban sprawl of Northeast Ohio. The park can be anywhere from 15 minutes to a half an hour away from civilization. Akron, Canton, Kent, and Cleveland and countless towns are all close by.

NATIONAL PARKS GUIDES: WHITE SANDS

This was one of our favorite campsites. The star gazing was some of the best ever, and because of the valley's alignment, you get a fantastic view of both sunset and sunrise. The cost of access is almost ludicrously low, and we were more than happy to spring for a sled and some wax at the gift shop and spend a few hours careening down the dunes.

NATIONAL PARKS GUIDES: HOT SPRINGS

The focus of this park is unabashedly the history of the region and the importance it played in the transformation of medicine at the time. The tours offered at the Fordyce Bathhouse are dripping with historical trivia, and walking through the building offers an incredible view into a time capsule of the United States during the Victorian-era.

NATIONAL PARK GUIDES: MAMMOTH CAVE

We were enchanted by the Historic Tour. This was one of our top experiences with our heroes in khaki. The history of the cave, from military asset to World Heritage site, is incredible. We just came to see "a hole in the ground", and came back out adventurers.

NATIONAL PARK GUIDES: SAN ANTONIO MISSIONS

The San Antonio Missions are the preserved remains of a series of Catholic Missions built by the Spanish in the 17th through the 19th century. The entire system of Missions throughout the Spanish Empire was designed to convert the local population, including the Pajalat, Nabedache, Coahuiltecan, and Hasanai. The park, which is also a UNESCO Heritage Site, is comprised of four distinct Missions.

END OF A ROAD; UPPING THE ANTE

The first time I saw Pittsburgh I knew I would leave her. She could be cold, nebby, and casually racist, but really, it was me. With so much out there to see in this world, I've never entertained the idea of being tied down to any one city. I've never had a car note, a mortgage, or a desire to settle down. While I appreciate the homes others have fashioned for themselves, I'm not quite ready for a long-term commitment. I have an ongoing joke of a New Year's resolution: all new mistakes. It's a way to remind myself to take chances, explore new territory, learn to dig deeper. It's a call to say yes to opportunities and have a sense of humor when things go awry.

DESERT VIBRATIONS

A glance toward the fuel gauge interrupted my enchantment. After our scare in West Texas, we had agreed to stay above 1/4 tank, and I alerted J that I'd be stopping at the next gas station to be safe. Cell reception was nonexistent in this remote stretch, but GPS alerted us to a number of nearing towns. We reverted back to taking in the breathtaking scene surrounding us. A closed general store situated at a crossroads made up the entirety of the town of Cima. Elora was a modest industrial plant of some sort. With the needle moving rapidly lower we came upon the railroad crossing that was the town of Hayden. Our humor was evaporating in time with our gas fumes.